Answered By: Writing Center
Last Updated: Nov 09, 2015     Views: 3

Again, in different writing situations, how the various ideas—the writer's and those from other sources—are arranged and integrated will vary. There isn't one correct way to organize and integrate ideas, but it is important that the audience see the logical connections between ideas and be able to distinguish when the writer is speaking and when a cited source is.

The following is one organizational scheme for a paragraph incorporating synthesis. It also labels the function of sentences in the previous question's example.

Topic sentence stating the writer's original claim or reason in support of the thesis.

Sentence(s) introducing/summarizing/paraphrasing/quoting supporting evidence from an outside source.

Sentence(s) explaining, analyzing, or extending the point made in the supporting evidence and its relationship to the idea in the topic sentence.

A transition indicating the relationship between the first and second piece of supporting evidence.

Sentence(s) introducing/summarizing/paraphrasing/quoting supporting evidence from a second outside source.

Sentence(s) explaining, analyzing, or extending the point made in the second piece of supporting evidence and its relationship to the idea in the topic sentence.

Sentence(s) naming, classifying, and explaining the relationship between the cited ideas.

Wrap-up sentence explaining the relationship between the cited ideas and the writer's main point

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